Friday, March 4, 2016

Scratch Session | Soup Stocks & Bone Broth From Scratch

Scratch Session | Stocks & Bone Broth by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

Last month I held the first of my new series of homesteading workshops here in my home in Portland, Oregon. Co-hosting along with me was Christiann and together we'd made a really fun and interesting day filled with tasty soups, stocks, broths, and breads. We went over the means of making a good soup, including the maillard reaction (when food turns gold while cooking due to the caramelization of the sugars within), thickening agents (flour, potatoes, eggs), layering flavors (adding sensitive bright flavors like fresh herbs towards the end of a long cooking time), cooking times (the advantages and disadvantages of each), animal parts, and so on. Christiann and I had spent the day prior cooking up a bunch of different stocks for the attendees to take home, and also for the test-test portion of the workshop. We laid out 8 bowls and a row of spoons, and together we tasted and compared the flavors of 6 hour versus 12 hour pork neck broth made with pork bones from Champoeg Creamery, 12 hour pork foot broth, 3 hour whole chicken stock made with chickens from Marion Acres, 3 hour chicken wing stock, avgolemono soup (chicken stock, lemon juice, and egg), roasted vegetable stock, and raw vegetable stock. The crowd favorites were the 12-hour pork neck broth and the avgole mono soup, and it was really interesting to taste the effect that the cooking time had on the stock side-by-side, and how different parts of the animal affected the flavor and richness of the stock (the chicken wing stock was much thicker and more flavorful than the whole chicken stock, due to all the cartridge from the joints in the wings).

Scratch Session | Stocks & Bone Broth by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

Scratch Session | Stocks & Bone Broth by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

We also had a DIY stock portion, where attendees teamed up and got to pluck produce from a table full of raw ingredients and make their own stocks, which simmered over our lunch break. For lunch, Christiann had made a giant braided loaf of bread and a bunch of twisted buns, which we had along with a traditional Japanese tonkatsu ramen made with the 12 hour pork neck stock, autumn chili made from a roasted vegetable stock, and delicious Vermont Creamery cheeses. After lunch we did a group taste test of everyone's stocks and it was really surprising how different everyone's stocks turned out considering they were pulling from the same general pool of ingredients. Using carrots in the stock made it noticeably sweeter, and a hefty dose of peppercorns left one stock with a wonderfully intense peppery bite after the end of each sip, whereas the stock with a good amount of mushrooms had a wonderful umami flavor to it. We ended the day by discussing the nutritional benefits of bone both (basically they're chock full of amino acids, which are the building blocks of all your cells) and talking about our favorite soups.

Scratch Session | Stocks & Bone Broth by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

Scratch Session | Stocks & Bone Broth by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

Scratch Session | Stocks & Bone Broth by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

Everyone got sent home with soup socks and herb sachets from the Food 52 Shop, poultry seasoning from Marion Acres  two linen tea towels and recipe cards from Heirloomed Collection, a Hatchery box, a pint of homemade bone broth, and a pint of homemade vegetable stock. We got to meet so many wonderful people and had such a great time staying warm inside eating a bunch of delicious stocks and stews while the winter wind whipped around outside. Thank you again to all of our attendees for coming, and a huge thanks to all of our sponsors below. We're having another Scratch Session next month on April 2nd and we'll be diving into mastering fermentation at home (think sourdough bread, kombucha, sauerkraut, and kefir), and in May we'll be making spring floral wreaths over mother's day weekend with Selva Floral and learning about edible flowers. You can sign up at the link below, we'd love to have you join us!


Thank you to our sponsors!

Marion Acres | Chicken
Champoeg Creamery | Pork bones
Vermont Creamery | Goats Cheese & Cultured Butter
Whole Foods | Pearl District | Organic Produce
Hatchery | subscription boxes, Wei Shallot Oil, Rosemary Oil

Scratch Session | Stocks & Bone Broth by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

Scratch Session | Stocks & Bone Broth by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

Scratch Session | Stocks & Bone Broth by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

Scratch Session | Stocks & Bone Broth by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

Scratch Session | Stocks & Bone Broth by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

Scratch Session | Stocks & Bone Broth by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

Scratch Session | Stocks & Bone Broth by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

Scratch Session | Stocks & Bone Broth by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

Following Photos by Christiann Koepke

Scratch Session | Stocks & Bone Broth by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

Scratch Session | Stocks & Bone Broth by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

Scratch Session | Stocks & Bone Broth by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

Scratch Session | Stocks & Bone Broth by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

Scratch Session | Stocks & Bone Broth by Eva Kosmas Flores | Adventures in Cooking

14 comments:

  1. Those breads look really amazing - I'm such a bread person!! - will you please please please share the recipe soon??
    http://bloglairdutemps.blogspot.pt/

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    1. Thank you!!! Those are all Christiann's, but I will see if she's putting the recipe up on her blog :D

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  2. I really love what you are doing with these homesteading sessions. I wish us Europeans could also participate through a video stream or whatever. I'd be happy to pay the ticket to learn these interesting things from you and Christiann! Broth always looks so daunting, but I guess when you know what you're doing it isn't as hard as it seems. Have a happy weekend dear Eva! x

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    1. Thank you so much Ingrid!! We're talking about a way to make the classes streamable, would be amazing to have you join via the web :) And I love making stock, it takes so many dishes to the net level when you start with a good solid footing!

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  3. I've been making broths for a while now but I've kind of stayed in a safe zone. I've been reading a lot about Japanese cooking though and was considering putting mushrooms in a vegetable broth but now I definitely will after reading this. Everything looks so amazing and beautiful. I feel like I walked into a modern day Dutch painting.

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    1. Awwww thank you Megan!! And yes, I highly recommend putting mushrooms in a veggie broth, they add such a great depth of umami flavor to the mix. Parmesan rinds are great for veggie stocks, too, or if you save a bunch in a bag in the freezer and accumulate a pound of them, you can make a stock of just parmesan rinds!

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  4. So inviting. I love these pictures. Thanks for sharing.

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  5. What a beautiful place, table setting & all the decor! Exactly my cup of tea! And of course absolutely amazing photos! I also love the atmosphere! I feel like I was there! :) I have to say that this week was my first time using my homemade chicken stock instead of water when making paella and the taste was incredible! What a difference it was!

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    1. It really is amazing what a huge difference a good homemade stock can make in a dish. I used the stock I made from the leftover turkey carcass after Thanksgiving and couldn't believe the huge difference it made in a stew recipe that I'd made several times before. So much richer and more savory :D

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  6. Oh this looks like so much fun. The problem with the internet is that it makes the world seem like such a small place and then something like this happens and I realise just how far away I am from the blogs I love!

    This looks just perfect, I love the rustic styling on the course notes and the bread and stock looks so delicious. This style of courses are just the kind of thing that everyone needs to know, but unless you do a course at culinary school, you're never going to fully cover these things.

    I'm really looking forward to the results of the fermentation class as I tried to make my own sauerkraut. I was less than successful and I managed to just make some mould!

    Thanks for introducing me to Portland Fresh as well - it's a fantastic blog.

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    1. Thank you dear Angela! I have a blog post on making your own sauerkraut if you want to take a look at it for tips:

      http://www.adventures-in-cooking.com/2014/11/kimchi-sauerkraut.html

      Fermentation at home is really fun but it definitely does take a few practice batches and the right fermentation tools like crocks and the like. And I'm so glad you like Christiann's blog, it's such a beautiful one!

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  7. This blog is just beyond good. Love this images so much fun :) http://getbestinductioncooktop.com/

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