Sunday, March 27, 2011

Taro Cake with Cream Cheese Frosting


Good news everyone, yesterday was my birthday, YAY!!!! I wanted to make myself a cake that would be fun, but still pretty. So I decided to make a cake with taro powder and do a really fancy job with the icing. I saw the technique featured here at Project Wedding by i am baker, whose original post about it is here. Lovely, yes? The flowers look complicated, but they're actually really easy to do. In fact, this is my first post including an instructional video. It's a short clip that just shows how it's done. I'll also describe it in the recipe.


What is taro, you say? I will tell you. Taro is a root that is light purple inside and is used in sweets in asian food. (EDIT: I have also been informed that it is used in savory foods too, especially curries. Yum!) I first had it as a flavoring for a boba tea I ordered in Korea town. It tastes the way cocoa butter smells, but sweeter. I love the flavor. I ordered taro root powder online from Nuts Online. The powder doesn't look that appetizing in the picture, but when it's blended into liquids and batters it turns this great lavender color and smells amazing. Well, enough description, it's time for the cake!



Ingredients:

4 Egg Whites
1 Whole Egg
2 and 3/4 Cup Cake Flour
1 Cup Ultrafine Sugar
1 Cup Whole Milk
12 Tablespoons Butter, softened
1 Tablespoon Baking Powder
1 Tablespoon Vegetable Oil
1 Teaspoon Vanilla Extract


Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Mix all of the dry ingredients together in a large bowl. Add the butter and blend until the mixture starts to clump together if you squeeze some in your hand. Then add the egg whites, one at a times, beating well after each addition. Add the whole egg, (not the shell, just the white and yolk), and the vegetable oil and blend until smooth. 



In a separate small bowl, mix the milk and the vanilla extract together. Then add them to the cake mix and blend until they form a smooth batter. Grease two 8 or 9 inch cake pans and equally distribute the cake batter between the two of them. Place them in the oven and bake for 25 to 35 minutes, or until a toothpick poked into the center of each cake layer comes out clean.


Once the pans are removed from the oven, shake them from side to side to loosen their grip on the bottom of the pan. Allow them to cool at room temperature for 15 minutes, then flip them over onto a plate, and over again so that they and right side up on a plate. Allow them to cool for 45 minutes.


Next, cut the dome off of the bottom layer of the cake so that the top layer will be able to lay flat on top of it. It is alright if the top layer has a dome, because that will look nice when it has the frosting roses on it. Place the bottom cake layer on a serving plate or cake stand and lightly frost the entire bottom layer. Then place the top layer on the bottom layer and lightly frost the entire top layer. 


Now comes the fun part, using a pastry bag and a 1M frosting tip, or some other large star tip, place the tip in the middle of where you want the rose to be, and start frosting, continuing around the middle in a circle until the rose is the desired size. Repeat this process until all of the top surface of the cake has been covered with roses. Then simply pump the frosting in a single line around the base of the cake using the same large star tip. Serve immediately & enjoy!



42 comments:

  1. Cool! I didn't know that Taro root could be used for a cake. We use it quite often for Indian cooking in savory dishes and it's a white root version.

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  2. That sounds like it would be very good, I'll have to check the Indian markets around here for some fresh ones.

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  3. Eeeppp! So sweet! Fabulously creative. Love that you included a little video tutorial with it! You should figure out a way to do that more often. Did you film it with your camera? I'm blanking on what camera you have...

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  4. Thanks babe! Yep, I filmed it with my Canon T2i, great little camera.

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  5. Taro root flour? As in taro/Hawaii/poi? How amazing! Had no idea it was that color, either.
    Happy Birthday to you, Eva! Your cake is lovely!

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  6. Happy Belated Birthday! Love yam/ taro cakes..your cake is so pretty the way you iced it.

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  7. Looks like we're both embracing a bit of the crazy with out recent baking projects! Beautiful icing job and stunning photos.

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  8. The cake takes my breath away. So beautiful. Great idea for the use of taro powder too. Purple is my favorite hue

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  9. Happy belated birthday Eva. That's a gorgeous cake. I'm not familiar with taro root flour. What a lovely color. And the way you iced the cake is "drop dead" gorgeous. Hope you have many more happy birthdays.
    Sam

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  10. Hi! Thanks for visiting my blog. Happy birthday!

    Your cake looks and sounds wonderful. Thanks for introducing me to taro root. It sounds really good and I love that it colored the cake so pretty. Love your cake decoration and video tutorial too:)

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  11. Thanks all :-) It really is quite a fun flavor to play around with.

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  12. Happy Belated Birthday:)! And the taro cake sounds like fun and delicious, I love taro flavoured cakes and taro bubble tea too :D)!!

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  13. Happy belated Birthday! The cake looks beautiful inside and especially on the outside. Great video tutorial :o)

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  14. Happy Birthday! My birthday was the day before yours ;)

    Such a beautiful cake and I think the color of the taro root in the cake is so pretty with the beautiful white frosting.

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  15. Thanks you guys! I really like the color combo too :)

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  16. I do love taro! Great looking cake... And a fun decorating technique! Thanks for sharing!

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  17. @Cakebrain: Thanks so much, glad you liked it :o)

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  18. Happy Happy Birthday! I love taro rolls but I have never seen it in cake form! So unique and the roses look so wonderful...I am terrible at decorating cakes but I feel like I could conquer this technique!

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  19. What a stunning cake! Very best wishes for your Birthday!

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  20. Thanks you two :)

    @foodies at home: You definitely could, it's surprisingly simple for how fancy it looks.

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  21. A beautiful and original cake! I'd love to have a slice with my coffee.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

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  22. We eat taro, but not as a sweet as some Asian cultures do - we eat it as a savory thing, in curries or boiled and salted. But using it in sweets is a nice way to show off its delicate lavender coloring.
    And your cake looks SO gorgeous!

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  23. @Indie.Tea: I've heard that from a couple other people, too, it sounds like a wonderful addition to curries. I'll have to make one and put some taro in it to try it savory-style, I love it sweet and am very curious as to how it would taste otherwise.

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  24. What a lovely color! Now I have to hunt me some taro root powder! I love the swirls on the cake, too. Beautifully done and happy birthday!

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  25. Mmm I've never tried a cake flavored with taro but like it a lot in other sweet things like bubble tea and coconut milk tapioca soup. Lovely color and piping too.

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  26. Such a pretty pretty cake :)

    Happy belated birthday!

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  27. gosh, i am seriously obsessed with taro right now! so glad you shared this!! this looks seriously great! thanks for sharing, lots of love happening for this and all your posts :)
    -meg
    @ http://clutzycooking.blogspot.com

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  28. I love Taro I am in love with a food. Nice job on the cake.

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  29. I fell in love with Taro from Bobba Tea too!! I have also had Tempura Taro...it is indeed good as a savory type food. I am for sure going to try this recipie. Thanks for saying where you got the powder from, it would be really hard to try this with fresh taro I am sure...lol

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  30. saw this last week and i ordered the taro powder. going to try it out today! im a big fan of taro tea so im sure ill love it :)

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  31. ok! devouring it as i type this: it is delicious! i used buttercream instead of creamcheese (not a fan of cream cheese) and its still great! i also used different colored mochi (from nuts.com) to decorate the top and bottom edges along with the roses. so it kinda look like a candy land cake now! :) thanks!

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  32. Awesome! I LOVE the idea of putting mulit-colored mochis on it, it must look so cute!!! I need to make this cake again, I still have some of the taro powder left over, maybe I'll make some cupcakes and decorate them with mochi :D

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  33. I was thinking about making this cake, was the cake sweet and did you make or buy the frosting?

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  34. The cake was definitely sweet, I made the frosting using the cream cheese frosting recipe from this post: http://adventurescooking.blogspot.com/2010/03/blue-velvet-cake-with-cream-cheese.html

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  35. I'm filipino, at in filipino markets we have a filipino version called Ube, what do you think if I used frozen grated ube or like an ube paste instead of the taro powder? I want to try to make it soon but don't want to hunt for taro powder.

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  36. I have been looking for a recipe for this cake for years. The Vietnamese nail salon I used to frequent in LA would serve this cake whenever one of their employees had a birthday. They didn't know how to make the cake because they bought them at a Vietnamese bakery. Bless You!

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    1. You are very welcome! I hope you enjoy it :D

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  37. Hi, how can i incorporate the taro powder into boxed cake mixes?

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    1. Hi! You could just mix it in with the dry cake mix and then follow the directions on the cake mix, maybe adding an extra tablespoon of vegetable oil since there's a bit more dry powder in the mix, now. Hope this helps! :)

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